Lightning at Last

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FINALLY!!! As with many of you, we woke this morning to the magical sound of thunder. Woohoo. 

I thought I had missed the boat, but just after 6am a cell decided to redevelop over my place in Butler.
Stoked to have got this shot, with no lightning trigger and handheld! Woohoo! First lightning shot with the zeiss!

Bring the storms!

Another underside shot from this morning.
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Storm Event 6/7-9-13( Gascoyne, Wheatbelt, Lower West)

The most promising setup for thunderstorm development since last summer was forecast for most of the southern half of Western Australia on the 6th of September, and that prompted a certain trip for myself to again get out and try to capture this magical weather phenomenon on my camera.

Just over a week before the storms arrived I noticed on my daily check of forecasted weather that I should start preparing for a road trip up towards the lower Gascoyne region to capture my favourite part, the development.

My day started at around 1030 with a drive to Coorow via Bindoon and the Bindoon Bakery. No storm chase can start without a stop here. So after enjoying a curry lamb pie, I was off up the Great Northern Highway towards Midlands Rd and on to Coorow via Moora.

I arrived in Coorow just after 1330, and had another look at the radar, and satellite imagery to see if anything looked like it was going to develop in the area. I wasn’t in luck, with storms started to fire a long way east on a low pressure trough line cutting through the state. I didn’t worry to much about it, as the afternoon was young, and it gave me a bit of time to scout the area a bit. I am currently working on a time-lapse project and the fields around here work perfectly for one of the scenes I wanted to capture, so off I went to find one suitable for my project.
I found an incredible site and set my camera up and started my time-lapse of the clouds building and collapsing. I had some more time up my sleeve now as my time-lapse was set for 1hr, so I had a bit of a walk around playing on my iPhone.

Coming close to the end of my time-lapse I noticed some development a long way to my north and north-east, so I opened my laptop and again checked the lightning tracker, and it confirmed a major thunderstorm developing very quickly between 150-200km away. I was in two minds, either packed up my camera, stop the time-lapse and move now, or wait for the time-lapse to finish. I decided to wait, as I only had 10minutes or so remaining, but it was the longest 10minutes ever. I was pacing up and down the road, watching these thunderstorm cells popping up and going crazy. They were too far away to see any lightning, but they were large cauliflower clouds with an every increasing anvil spreading across the sky.

My time-lapse finished, I packed my gear up and raced east towards Latham.
I kept my eyes on the development, and I had to pull over near Latham to capture one of the storms.

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As I got to Latham, I had to turn south and now head towards Wubin for fuel, and to meet with fellow storm chaser and friend Steve Brooks (owner of Perth Weather Live, http://www.perthweatherlive.com).

I arrived in Wubin, and met with Steve. He had been watching the cells to the north as well, so with a quick check of the radar to see the direction these cells were going, we saw that they were going to cross well south of Paynes Find to the north, and so the decision was made to get north, and find a spot to set up and capture these systems as they passed us by.

While we were driving the sun started to set and the thunderclouds become illuminated with incredible colours. It was incredible to witness. We were so focused to get to our spot that we missed the opportunity to capture the sunset at its best, but, we still still got a bit of colour and you can see that how it would’ve been incredible 5-10mins before hand.

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When we arrived at our location, we set up and started to capture the storms in the distance. One was to our North-East, one was t our North-West. Both were firing on all cylinders. Flashing, and sparking everywhere. Every second multiple strikes illuminated the clouds. So what did I do. I set up my time-lapse to capture it. I havent finished processing that yet, but when I do, I will post a link to the page it will be hosted on.

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Then the night really began.

A shot of a meteor flying over first cells of the night to the north.

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As the first cells passed over and headed east, the skies to the west now started to light up. Cells were quickly developing to our west, and were going nuts!!

A shot of the Milky Way with the storms firing underneath.

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Large amounts of rain mixed with hail were falling from incredible formations in the clouds.
Something about the structure I just love underneath thunderstorms.

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Lightning was all around

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One of the final cells that passed over before I had to make the long drive home.

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I had to leave, as I had to get back to Perth. The drive home was very eventful. Large hail, strong winds, lightning all around.

An extremely eventful night, but I am so glad I was able to witness it, and not on my own either. Cheers Steve, it was so great to have someone else there, yelling out as much as I was!! 🙂

I just hope this is an indication of a very active spring/summer storm season in the Midwest and Wheatbelt.

More photos to come.

Till next time.

Rainbows under the Stars

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Well if I hadn’t seen it, I wouldn’t have believed it. Rainbows at night time. The conditions were perfect for them though, and it proves you only need the reflected light of the sun off the almost full moon to give you the key ingredient for rainbows.
I was actually out to capture the cold front coming across the coast, and hoping for a bit of lightning, but I was given a rainbow show instead. A definite favourite, as it’s something you don’t see every day (or night for that matter).

This was taken at Jindalee Beach.

All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

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Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

– Good Mornings –

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Showers and the gentle rumble of distant thunder greet me outside my accommodation at one of my favourite places in the whole world, Karijini.

I remember waking up, making my west-bix and eating it on the porch, just watching this storm approaching over the brilliant red landscape.
The contrast of colours, on this particular morning was out of this world. The yellows/reds of the ground the rain being highlighted by the morning sun rays, all set on a dark and storm background.
One of those moments that never leave you mind. I am glad I had my first DSLR with me at the time. The trusty old Canon 30D.

Epic!

– Tropical Storms in Bali – 

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One of the best things about visiting the tropics are the amazing thunderstorms that tend to just pop up out of nowhere.
After watching a bit of cloud build up just to the north of Kuta, I raced up to my room grabbed my gear and then set up my camera to time-lapse the developing cells.

After not being able to get to Darwin last wet season, I might just make it this year. Here’s hoping 🙂

Sunset over Cooke Point, Port Hedland

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This week I am visiting my brother and my best mate in Port Hedland. It is the first time I have visited the port town. My first day here and I was able to capture this sunset over the road of my mates place.

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Another image I capture ( from my iPhone 5 ) from the plane as I was descending into Port Hedland. It shows a dust storm in the distance.

Approaching Storms

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Last month I travelled north to capture storms that were forecast to develop around the Jurien/Coorow/Moora areas.
After a big night of lightning near Jurien, the storms started to develop further inland.
I was on my way to meet up with another storm photographer Marie and her parter Arek, when I saw this developing just to my north.
It turned out to be quite nasty when it hit, strong wind gusts, and isolated very heavy rain impacted the area, about 30km or so NNW of Moora.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

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Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Stormy Sunsets

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I am not one to bring my camera to work, but with the threat of thunderstorms it was a given that it was going to accompany me.

The day was coming to a close and having experienced an absolute scorcher (41C) it was very fitting to have just one of the most beautiful sunsets I have witnessed appear in front of us.
While we ate dinner, I had to set up and get this shot.

I hope you enjoy it 🙂

Taken on the south-eastern edge of Moore River National Park, Western Australia.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

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Lightning over the Airport

Severe storms are continuing to lash parts of the south-west region of Western Australia today with a couple of towns recording daily rainfall readings of greater then 100mm.
This is all being caused by a low pressure system just hanging off the coast, that is dragging a lot of moisture into the south-west.
The last few days I have been working out of the airport, and while the storms passed over today I grabbed my camera to try my hand at capturing some daylight lightning. With the trigger all ready, I pointed the camera out in the middle of the airfield and managed to capture a couple of strikes.

Here is one, and ill post the others later tonight.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Perth’s Stormy Start To Summer

Perth usually is really starting to warm up at this time of year, with thunderstorms not uncommon to pop up in the forecast. The start of summer this year has been a relatively unusual stormy one. Not that I am complaining one little bit, the opportunities to get out and about to capture these storms has been fantastic.
The last week I have been working out of Perth Airport, so when I am not too busy, I have been able to get out and grab a few photos.
Here are a couple of shots I have managed over the last 3 days. With a few more still to be downloaded.

This shot was taken from the new viewing platform over the 03 threshold at Perth International.

Perth Airport Sunset

This is taken at 7am out the front, with our Helitacts parked up underneath the mammatus clouds above.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Perth Storms 4 & 5-12-12

The day started with the forecast of possible thunderstorms to develop to the north of Perth in the early afternoon and later impact Perth when the sun dipped below the horizon. I went into work with my camera all ready to go, just incase I was out in the field and was able to get a couple of sneaky shots. As it turned out, I was called to a couple of fires and the chance of capturing the thunderstorms during the afternoon quickly diminished.

The storm started appearing on the radar at around 10pm as I was arriving home from work, and was slowly developing and looking to tracked straight down the coast. I was quickly in and out of the shower, had all my gear back into my car, and bolted down the beach to meet up with fellow storm photographer nut Cameron Fisher. The lightning started to really ramp up as it was getting closer to the coast, with the most activity happening just off the coast at around midnight. Storms were also developing further inland, but there was no way we were moving, as the coastal cells were really giving us a great show.

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Storms are again forecast for next Monday the 10th, so we are watching the charts and models to plan our next trip to capture this fantastic natural phenomenon.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Feel free to comment or contact me if you have any questions in regard to the shots at
info@jordancantelo.com

Lower Central West – Perth Metro Storms

It is not very often in Perth that we are in a position to be on the receiving end of border line severe storms on almost consecutive days. (3 days apart to be exact). The storms in the middle of the week were just awesome, but they were really just a precursor to what was to come 3 days later.
Watching the charts after coming home exhausted from the mid-week chase, a few of us noticed that the weekend, particularly Saturday was going to bring a very good chance of well set-up storms.
The charts said the best place to be and where they were going to be at their most impressive was up around the Moora sub-districts at around 3pm. But as is usually the case, the storms started firing a touch earlier then planned. So I headed off an hour or so earlier then I had initially intended to.

The first place to meet was Bindoon, a small to medium sized farming town on the outskirts of the Perth metropolitan area, and home to one of the best bakeries ever. This was also the location that I would meet up with fellow photographer Glenn Casey.

After meeting up, we looked at the weather radar and realised that the storms had really started to develop. So it was a case of get to Moora, and to get there fast. While driving north we paralleled a very mature thunderstorm to our east. It was huge, and it was with no question that we pulled over to take a few photos. But knowing that this wasn’t the only storm that was going to develop for the day we jumped back into the cars and headed further north towards a farm we knew would give us great views of the developing cells.

We arrived at a canola field about 35km south of Moora, and realised quickly that this was going to be a very interesting day. Storms were popping and exploding right in front of us.
I took this 48 image panorama from the location.

The storms were just firing up everywhere, one after the other.  Just to the north (left hand side of the above image) a quite severe storm was developing and we thought it would be a great opportunity to catch and jump in front of it to grab a few structure shots. So off we headed, a 25km drive to the south towards New Norcia.

We pulled up just off the side of the road, about 10km to the west of New Norcia. Looking north the storms were glowing green and billowing with inflow winds easily reaching 40-50km/h.  It was spurting cloud to cloud (CC) lightning and a few cloud to ground (CG) strikes, with the thunder incredibly loud. It surely was getting very close, and just as it looked like we were right in the path, the storm started tracking slightly to the SW. It was being pulled towards the coast by a developing low pressure system hanging just off the coast. It was good for us, it gave us a fantastic opportunity to get some great photos, but what it meant now, is that the northern suburbs of Perth were now it the direct line of these very intense, hail ridden thunderstorms. Hail the size of golf balls had now been recorded and all I could see now was the chance of a repeat of the devastating hail storm back in March 2010.

I shot this photo as the storm started to track SW.

After the storm passed to our west, it was now apparent that the storms were definitely under the influence of the low pressure off the coast, and they were heading SW towards Perth. To keep up with these storms we had to make a decision and make it quickly to what our next move was going to be. We decided to get moving as soon as possible to get towards the coast. We drove from New Norcia, through Mogumber, towards Regans Ford, and then on to the coast via north of Gingin, and finally at Two Rocks. We arrived just on sunset, and what a colourful sunset it was. With a system now to our north heading out to sea. I took this shot.


The winds were howling on the coast. Inflow winds to 50kmh would be a rough estimate, but I don’t think I would be far off. Sea spray was a bit of an issue trying to get a clear shot, but we still managed to get a few shots of lightning as the daylight disappeared.


In conclusion the day was quite the event. I haven’t chased a storm where it was forecast to head SE away from the metro area, to then change complete direction and put the metro area at great risk from very serious damage.

The storms were well covered by fellow chasers, all with different reports and encounters and kept live reports coming in.
I used multiple resources while chasing these storms, the official forecast and radar images from the Bureau of Meteorology Australia, Weatherzone.com.au, and Perth Weather Live ( PWL ) (  Perthweatherlive.com.au ). Perth Weather Live can also be found on Facebook. I am also apart of a fantastic group at WaWeathergroup.com. Both PWL and WaWeathergroup are a constant form of support and provide me with constant updates. So I thank them both.

The wild weather is certainly not over for the Perth area. With a very strong (very late in the year) low pressure system/ cold front due to impact the coast mid week.
I hope to be out and about during this coming system, so I hope to bring you photos, possible video and another report of my encounters during the day.

Thank you for reading and enjoying my photos. If you enjoy reading my post, feel free to leave an email at info@jordancantelo.com and feel free to comment below.

Until the next event……..

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Approaching Storms

Well not much has been happening in the way of any significant weather in Perth for the past few months that I have been able to capture as I have been away with work. But I did miss a tornado in the northern suburbs, as well as a very severe storm that caused major havoc in the southern suburbs near Rockingham and Mandurah, all the way around the South-West of Western Australia.
So I was a little excited as I got home from work today and checked the radar on a local weather website, to see a fairly dense rain band  approaching.
The radar was showing very heavy rain with a slight chance of some thunderstorm activity.
With this in mind I quickly packed up my gear, bolted to the beach and tried to get a photo of some lightning or at least some type of structure in the system.
Unfortunately the lightning never eventuated and the system fell apart as it was approaching the coast. Needless to say I wasn’t going to head home without getting a panorama for my efforts.

Approaching Storms

Well not much has been happening in the way of any significant weather in Perth for the past few months that I have been able to capture as I have been away with work. But I did miss a tornado in the northern suburbs, as well as a very severe storm that caused major havoc in the southern suburbs near Rockingham and Mandurah, all the way around the South-West of Western Australia.
So I was a little excited as I got home from work today and checked the radar on a local weather website, to see a fairly dense rain band  approaching.
The radar was showing very heavy rain with a slight chance of some thunderstorm activity.
With this in mind I quickly packed up my gear, bolted to the beach and tried to get a photo of some lightning or at least some type of structure in the system.
Unfortunately the lightning never eventuated and the system fell apart as it was approaching the coast. Needless to say I wasn’t going to head home without getting a panorama for my efforts.

 

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Cloud Wallpaper


Just the other day, a strong winter cold front came across the West Australian coast, now as I was at work I was unable to get out and capture the front as it came across but I did manage to capture, what I think to be an interesting shot of the clouds just before the front hit. Now you may not be able to really notice this in the photo I am showing you, but now you know the story behind the photo.

Details
Canon 5d Mark II
24-105mm f4.0L IS USM + CircPol
A: f9.0
T: 1/200
ISO: 100