Autumn Storms over the South West 16-5-13

I was woken this morning by the deep rumble of thunder in the distance.
I am usually rather lethargic getting out of bed in the morning, but that beautiful sound that is thunder, I am up in a flash. I was dressed and ready to head out within a few minutes.

When I glanced outside, the early morning rays of the sun were just touching the base of the clouds. I raced down the stairs of my hotel room, jumped in my car and got to the beach.
This is what greeted me.

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With reports from the Yallingup area that the storms were dropping water spouts behind me, I had to make the trip towards home.
The potential for storms to still fire into the night was still there, so with that in mind, I headed to Jindalee beach once I finished work and managed to capture this strike.

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The lightning wasn’t very frequent, so I am somewhat happy with this, because it was the best shot of the night.
I do love every type of thunderstorm, but the summer ones where I can chase them around the Wheatbelt region are far more enjoyable, and you can get a hell of a lot closer.

Bring back summer already.

I hope you like the images.

Central Wheatbelt Storms 16-3-13

It’s that time of the year again when thunderstorms start to develop and make their way over the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia. Today marked my first Autumn trip into the Wheatbelt and with a severe weather warning issued it was set to be a big day.
Initially the storms were forecast to be about the Perth Hills by mid afternoon and then track east. I wanted to capture the development and again some structure so I thought I would base myself away from the movement of the storms and head towards Goomalling, a small country town about 150km NE of Perth. This area is usually the prime spot for development, but it also has good access in all directions, so it’s a good place to re-access your plan of attack.

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So I arrived in Goomalling, and storms were already developing and maturing a lot further east then they were forecast to. So I refuelled my car, and headed toward Dowerin, then Wyalkatchem, onto Trayning, then finally ended up in Nungarin, just as the show was really starting to fire up.

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Seeing the storms structure during the day is incredible, and I love capturing that, but at dusk as the sun is setting, that twilight time when the lightning is now illuminating the clouds, that is magical. The sky was clear above me with stars starting to appear, but to my east, the best strobe show I have seen for a long time was occurring, it was breathtakingly beautiful. I set up my camera and proceeded to capture my time-lapse that I had come to get.

The lightning was unbelievable, and I even managed my first ever capture of lightning coming out of the top of a cloud.
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As the storms moved further to SE they did not loose any momentum, and if anything they might have started to get more active. It was a strobe show, like none other I’ve seen before. A line of thunderstorms in perfect harmony, all linked and firing off. It was incredible to see.

As I moved my camera to face the cells moving further away, I started to notice a feature low on the horizon that looked very suss. To me this looked like a tornado, but it could’ve quite realistically been just low scud cloud that was arranged in a way that made it look like one. Maybe, maybe not. We will never know, because out here luckily, we are very sparsely populated.
Here is the photo, and leave a comment to let me know what you think.
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This is my track map for the day, thanks to Google Maps. A total of 650km for the day, not that far by any stretch and definitely not the furthest I have travelled chasing and photographing.
Screen Shot 2013-03-17 at 4.01.06 PM
I am currently processing more images, time-lapse and video (I got some rotation in a cloud that looks amazing on GoPro) of the night, and that will be posted in the coming days.

I recorded a live stream while I was out there, and you can hear it here
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/30019393

A small video I created of time-lapse from the day, watch in at least 720p HD

Till next time 🙂

Sunset over Cooke Point, Port Hedland

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This week I am visiting my brother and my best mate in Port Hedland. It is the first time I have visited the port town. My first day here and I was able to capture this sunset over the road of my mates place.

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Another image I capture ( from my iPhone 5 ) from the plane as I was descending into Port Hedland. It shows a dust storm in the distance.

Lightning over Jandakot and Perth Hills

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On Wednesday (20th, Feb) I headed to Jandakot Airport for a bbq with fellow workmates. The night started as any other, something to eat, a couple of drinks. Then the clouds started rolling in. Lightning began flashing on the western horizon and it wasn’t long till it was over us. I headed to the lookout, and set up my camera. The lightning tracked just to the south and east of the airport, providing a great opportunity to capture a few shots.

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Lightning, I just cannot get enough of its beauty. No single strike is ever the same, and it truly is a genuine shot. No-one else will ever capture the same strike again.
Hope to capture more as I head north to Port Hedland next week.

I also run another photoblog website at
Severeweatherphotography.com.au

I update when ever head out and follow thunderstorms and manage to capture natures most incredible phenomena.

If you enjoy my page, it would be great if you can share my website address around.

Lightning over Jandakot and the Perth Hills

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On Wednesday (20th, Feb) I headed to Jandakot Airport for a bbq with fellow workmates. The night started as any other, something to eat, a couple of drinks. Then the clouds started rolling in. Lightning began flashing on the western horizon and it wasn’t long till it was over us. I headed to the lookout, and set up my camera. The lightning tracked just to the south and east of the airport, providing a great opportunity to capture a few shots.

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Lightning, just cannot get enough of its beauty. No single strike is ever the same, and it truly is a genuine shot. No-one else will ever capture the same strike again.
Hope to capture more as I head north to Port Hedland next week.

– Approaching Storms –

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Last month I travelled north to capture storms that were forecast to develop around the Jurien/Coorow/Moora areas.
After a big night of lightning near Jurien, the storms started to develop further inland.
I was on my way to meet up with another storm photographer Marie and her parter Arek, when I saw this developing just to my north.
It turned out to be quite nasty when it hit, strong wind gusts, and isolated very heavy rain impacted the area, about 30km os so NNW of Moora.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Perth Storms 4 & 5-12-12

The day started with the forecast of possible thunderstorms to develop to the north of Perth in the early afternoon and later impact Perth when the sun dipped below the horizon. I went into work with my camera all ready to go, just incase I was out in the field and was able to get a couple of sneaky shots. As it turned out, I was called to a couple of fires and the chance of capturing the thunderstorms during the afternoon quickly diminished.

The storm started appearing on the radar at around 10pm as I was arriving home from work, and was slowly developing and looking to tracked straight down the coast. I was quickly in and out of the shower, had all my gear back into my car, and bolted down the beach to meet up with fellow storm photographer nut Cameron Fisher. The lightning started to really ramp up as it was getting closer to the coast, with the most activity happening just off the coast at around midnight. Storms were also developing further inland, but there was no way we were moving, as the coastal cells were really giving us a great show.

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Storms are again forecast for next Monday the 10th, so we are watching the charts and models to plan our next trip to capture this fantastic natural phenomenon.

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Feel free to comment or contact me if you have any questions in regard to the shots at
info@jordancantelo.com

Lower Central West – Perth Metro Storms

It is not very often in Perth that we are in a position to be on the receiving end of border line severe storms on almost consecutive days. (3 days apart to be exact). The storms in the middle of the week were just awesome, but they were really just a precursor to what was to come 3 days later.
Watching the charts after coming home exhausted from the mid-week chase, a few of us noticed that the weekend, particularly Saturday was going to bring a very good chance of well set-up storms.
The charts said the best place to be and where they were going to be at their most impressive was up around the Moora sub-districts at around 3pm. But as is usually the case, the storms started firing a touch earlier then planned. So I headed off an hour or so earlier then I had initially intended to.

The first place to meet was Bindoon, a small to medium sized farming town on the outskirts of the Perth metropolitan area, and home to one of the best bakeries ever. This was also the location that I would meet up with fellow photographer Glenn Casey.

After meeting up, we looked at the weather radar and realised that the storms had really started to develop. So it was a case of get to Moora, and to get there fast. While driving north we paralleled a very mature thunderstorm to our east. It was huge, and it was with no question that we pulled over to take a few photos. But knowing that this wasn’t the only storm that was going to develop for the day we jumped back into the cars and headed further north towards a farm we knew would give us great views of the developing cells.

We arrived at a canola field about 35km south of Moora, and realised quickly that this was going to be a very interesting day. Storms were popping and exploding right in front of us.
I took this 48 image panorama from the location.

The storms were just firing up everywhere, one after the other.  Just to the north (left hand side of the above image) a quite severe storm was developing and we thought it would be a great opportunity to catch and jump in front of it to grab a few structure shots. So off we headed, a 25km drive to the south towards New Norcia.

We pulled up just off the side of the road, about 10km to the west of New Norcia. Looking north the storms were glowing green and billowing with inflow winds easily reaching 40-50km/h.  It was spurting cloud to cloud (CC) lightning and a few cloud to ground (CG) strikes, with the thunder incredibly loud. It surely was getting very close, and just as it looked like we were right in the path, the storm started tracking slightly to the SW. It was being pulled towards the coast by a developing low pressure system hanging just off the coast. It was good for us, it gave us a fantastic opportunity to get some great photos, but what it meant now, is that the northern suburbs of Perth were now it the direct line of these very intense, hail ridden thunderstorms. Hail the size of golf balls had now been recorded and all I could see now was the chance of a repeat of the devastating hail storm back in March 2010.

I shot this photo as the storm started to track SW.

After the storm passed to our west, it was now apparent that the storms were definitely under the influence of the low pressure off the coast, and they were heading SW towards Perth. To keep up with these storms we had to make a decision and make it quickly to what our next move was going to be. We decided to get moving as soon as possible to get towards the coast. We drove from New Norcia, through Mogumber, towards Regans Ford, and then on to the coast via north of Gingin, and finally at Two Rocks. We arrived just on sunset, and what a colourful sunset it was. With a system now to our north heading out to sea. I took this shot.


The winds were howling on the coast. Inflow winds to 50kmh would be a rough estimate, but I don’t think I would be far off. Sea spray was a bit of an issue trying to get a clear shot, but we still managed to get a few shots of lightning as the daylight disappeared.


In conclusion the day was quite the event. I haven’t chased a storm where it was forecast to head SE away from the metro area, to then change complete direction and put the metro area at great risk from very serious damage.

The storms were well covered by fellow chasers, all with different reports and encounters and kept live reports coming in.
I used multiple resources while chasing these storms, the official forecast and radar images from the Bureau of Meteorology Australia, Weatherzone.com.au, and Perth Weather Live ( PWL ) (  Perthweatherlive.com.au ). Perth Weather Live can also be found on Facebook. I am also apart of a fantastic group at WaWeathergroup.com. Both PWL and WaWeathergroup are a constant form of support and provide me with constant updates. So I thank them both.

The wild weather is certainly not over for the Perth area. With a very strong (very late in the year) low pressure system/ cold front due to impact the coast mid week.
I hope to be out and about during this coming system, so I hope to bring you photos, possible video and another report of my encounters during the day.

Thank you for reading and enjoying my photos. If you enjoy reading my post, feel free to leave an email at info@jordancantelo.com and feel free to comment below.

Until the next event……..

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

First Severe storms of the season 2012/13

Well what a night, here are a few photos from our storm chase the other night following a couple of severe systems in the Central West district of Western Australia.

I will post a chase report tomorrow, but until then please enjoy a couple of photos from the night, plus a milky way shot, in between shooting lightning.





I turned to the south and saw the milky way in all its glory. Not one to miss an opportunity, I quickly turned to get a shot off.

 

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All photos used on this site severewatherphotography.wordpress.comsevereweatherphotography.com.au, jordancantelophotography.wordpress.com & http://www.jordancantelo.com are copyright and are the property of Jordan Cantelo. Strictly no reproduction or commercial use allowed without prior approval.

Photography website limitations.

Please Note: The best care has been taken to accurately represent the finished photograph in the online gallery, however due to web limitations and differences in individual user’s monitor settings, printed photograph colours may differ slightly from the photographs viewed on this website.

Storm fronts moving over the Perth Coast

Still not a whole lot of activity has been happening on the western front in the last few months, so again I have been wondering through the storm archives on my hard drive and found this image of the leading edge of a storm that passed over the Perth coast in December last year. Little did I know at the time I took this photo, that later on that evening I would capture some of my best lightning photos to date.
The rest of my photos (including the lightning I captured) from the night can be found here:

Perth Thunderstorms 12th December 2011

Details of this photo

Canon 5d Mark II
24-105mm f4.0 IS USM + CircPol + Lee Filters Soft Grad
A: f9.0
T: 1/5
ISO: 100

Anymore details, feel free to contact me at
info@jordancantelo.com

Building storms over the Kennedy Ranges

Not much as been happening with the weather lately in Perth, well not much in the way of thunderstorms or interesting weather to be exact.
The final weekend of summer is quickly drawing to a close for yet another year and hopefully with the return of autumn and winter, a more photographic weather patten may develop.
Saying that, summer has brought with it some stunning sunsets and I have a few of those on my other photographic blogsite at
http://www.jordancantelo.com

In the meantime, I continue to look through the photographs I have taken in recent times and have found this one. I hope you like it.


Details
Canon 5d Mark II
24-70mm f2.8L USM IS + CircPol
A: f8
T: 1/500
ISO: 100

Remnants of Tropical Cyclone Iggy

Over the last week or so, Tropical Cyclone Iggy has been lingering off the West Australian coast, threatening to cross with potentially severe winds and rain. He didn’t.
Iggy was first classified as a cyclone in the early hours of Australia day (January 26th). He was situated roughly 820km NW of Exmouth and 970km WNW of Karratha. Ever so slowly moving towards the Pilbara coast.
The Pilbara was put on cyclone watch as Iggy slowly intensified. Initially Iggy was forecasted to reach Cat 3 or even Cat 4 by the time it hit the Pilbara, but this never eventuated.
Iggy played around in the Indian Ocean making a couple of small dashes towards the coast and then retreating. From what I was hearing from weather forecasters, this cyclone was one of the more difficult cyclones to future forecast track. All meteorological models for the area were showing all different scenarios.
Iggy eventually started to make his way south into ‘cooler’ waters and very slowly started to weaken, and eventually was declared an ex tropical cyclone in the morning on Feb 2nd.
In the late evening on Feb 2nd 2012 Ex-Tropical Cyclone Iggy made landfall near Jurien Bay, 250km north of Western Australia’s capital Perth.
Gale force winds and high tides with rough surf affected some coastal sites near the Gascoyne town of Geraltdon. Beach erosion was observed and strong winds battered the coastal town throughout the day.

Remnants of Iggy hit areas around Perth. The coastal town of Lancelin, 140km N of Perth received almost 98.8mm of rain from 3pm Feb 2nd – 12am the following day.
Perth received 20.2mm.

The photo was taken at about 3am as Ex tropical cyclone Iggy was dumping his last bit of rain onto Perth.

Details
Canon 5d Mark II
24-105mm f4.0, No filters
A: f9
T: 45s
ISO: 50

All photos on this blog are available for purchase. If you are interested, or just want to enquire, please contact me via my contact page.


Mature Cumulonimbus


Adding to the collection of photos that I have acquired over the last few days from the storms that have been developing over the Kennedy Range here in the Gascoyne, I haven’t  posted a photo of the structure from a distance.
This was taken after we landed back at Carnarvon, its shows the storm now showing the characteristics of a well matured and structured thunderstorm. This cell is the same one I captured in my previous post @ Rain Sheets over the Gascoyne 40 mins prior.

Details
3 Image stitch
Canon 5d Mark II
24-70mm f2.8L + CircPol
A:f8
T: 1/320
ISO: 100

Rain Sheets over the Gascoyne

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Another band of thunderstorms developed over the Kennedy Range. The second round of storms over the last 2 days. With the build up came with it rain and did it rain. From the air it looked like at least 20-40mm could have fallen in some places. Maybe a little more in others. As you can see in this photograph its pretty evident that it was heavy and widespread.

Also notice the slight red tinge to the base of the clouds. I think its due to the red dust in the air from the sand dunes below.

Details

Canon 5d Mark II
24-70mm f2.8L + CircPol
A: f9
S: 1/80
ISO: 100

Wheatbelt Storms 30-12-11

Hi All,
Well after about a fortnight break we had another hint of potential storms that could potentially develop through the Wheatbelt region of WA. There was a touch of disagreement about whether the storms would develop and if they did they wouldn’t last for long. Though there was enough positive thinking (we were going to head out anyway) amongst a few of us to take the chance and head out.
I got chatting to a few other members of the WA weather group and we decided that we would meet in Brookton and assess from there what our plan of attack for the day would be.
It’s kind of cool really to have this group of people who have a common interest that you have, and to be able to live out this interest in the form of chasing storms with them is just awesome. It is always slightly nerve racking meeting new people because you just don’t know how they are going to be like, and meeting with Tom and Luke for the first time, I knew straight away we were going to have a great afternoon running around the SW part of the Wheatbelt.

The chase started as I said in Brookton about 1330 and we headed out to the west of Town to the local lookout and try and get a vantage point looking over the fields that stretch out forever. The lookout itself wasn’t the best in the world but gave us a small window to look through and see what was happening around the place. We sat there for about 30mins and then decided that a better point could be about 15km east of Brookton, so off we went.
Again after arriving at our next location (a farm 15km East of Brookton) at 1430, it became fairly obvious that if anything was going to happen it would be to the south of Brookton.


Looking at the radar this was confirmed with a nice developing cell SW of Brookton. So again off we went back into Brookton and headed south onto the Great Southern Highway towards Pingelly.
We stopped 5mins South of Brookton to grab a couple of photos and video of the system developing and then continued to Pingelly.


We travelled in convoy (2 cars) towards Pingelly and stopped about 2km north of the townsite. We had a great view of the now well developed cell towards the west. On the radar, we calculated it to be about 25km to the WNW of Pingelly.

It cell was throwing out a fair amount of lightning and it had a pretty decent hail sheet coming out of it as well. As far as we could tell from the radar, the cell was travelling through the Jarrah/Wandoo forests and luckily wasn’t posing a threat to anyone at that time.

I got in contact with another chaser who was chasing a little further north and explained to her what was happening down our end and she made her way with her parter towards our position.
We now had a strong convoy of 3 cars heading south parallel with this storm. We all decided that we needed to get in front of this storm and somewhat “intercept” it, if we were going to get any good footage. So we headed south through Pingelly along the highway trying to find a suitable road on the western side to travel down.
That road came about 15km south of Pingelly and you can see footage from that road in the first part of my video post.

When the cell was getting a little too close for comfort we all headed further south to Narrogin to the towns lookout to get a good vantage point. It was a great lookout. It faced west overlooking the large wheatbelt town and did we witness some close lightning! It was unreal. Some big thick bolts came down in town and around us. It was quite intense for a few minutes.

After Narrogin again we decided we needed to travel further south towards Wagin, but we only got to just outside of Highbury (15km South of Narrogin). My second part of my video.
The cell that we were chasing was now just starting to show small signs of weakening. From the radar it looked as if the storm was breaking into two separate cells. One moving towards the WSW (unusual for this part of WA) and the other E of our position at Highbury.

We all were pretty happy with the chase, and personally it was great to meet another 2 members of the WA weather group, and magic to again meet up with another 2 chasers who I have met before.

Enjoy the video.

Until the next storm……

The radar from the day can be found here if you copy and paste the link into your address bar. (I’m not tech savvy enough to get it on here, if you know how I could then please let me know)
http://www.oscilmet.com.au/?page=loops.main&radar=701&numberofImages=21&dateStart=1325215200&dateFinish=1325259600

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Perth Thunderstorms 12th December 2011

Wowwee. What a crazy night out last night. I haven’t seen that kind of lightning action for a long time in Perth. I know other places around the country get this all the time, but for Perth it was a great start to hopefully a fairly active summer storm season. Perth had a total of 43.6mm in the gauge to 9am this morning (the 3rd wettest December day), while other places around the south west land division had record falls in and around 70mm. Williams, a town 150km SE of Perth, had the wettest December day ever and second wettest day of all time with 125.6mm.
It was all caused by a mid level disturbance that was situated off our west coast and was fed moisture by a decaying tropical cyclone that has been lingering around in the Indian Ocean the past week.

Now this rain is great for our dams, but take a thought for our farmers. After a better then average winter rain cycle that produced the best crops for a number of years, this rain is an unwanted friend, hampering harvesting efforts and in some cases completely destroying entire crops.

I was very fortunate to meet up with some other weathernuts from WA based forum WAweathergroup.com to watch and record this system approach and come over the coast.

If you are interested in the weather in any shape or form then this forum is the place to be.  A West Australian based group of very friendly, enthusiastic and open minded people with common interests who are willing to answer any weather related question. You don’t have to be from Western Australia  to join as they have forums that cover most topics from around the country and the parts of the world.   The forum has members throughout the state that provide regular observations of the current weather conditions affecting their area.
The group is heavily involved in a social media capacity as well with active Twitter and Facebook groups.

Twitter : @TheWAWG
Facebook : Wa WeatherGroup

So if this interests you I would highly recommend joining.

Here are a couple of photos from last night.

If you would like to know the settings for each of the separate photos then just PM me.

Till next time……

Lightning over Gnangara Pine Plantation

Lightning over Gnangara Pine Plantation

A thunderstorm passing through the northern suburbs of Perth, Western Australia on the 16th Feb 2011. Summer storms like this one can potentially start fires when they pass through, especially when they pass straight over the tinder dry needles of the pine plantation. Lucky on this day the storm brought a decent rain with it. Other days, we are not so lucky.

  • Canon 5d Mark II
  • L: 24-105mm f4.0L IS
  • T: 1/5
  • A: f22@24mm
  • ISO: 50

Lower Midwest / Wheatbelt / Northern Lower West Storm Event

Everyone were on edge today as thunderstorms were expected to develop through the Lower Midwest, the Wheatbelt and northern parts of the Lower West districts of Western Australia.
After hearing the possibility that thunderstorms could develop today, and from having discussions last week, and following the advice of others,  I decided that the best place to head would be Coorow. A small farming town about 2 1/2hours drive north.  There are a couple of ways you can drive to Coorow, but I made sure that my trip there included a stop at the Bindoon Bakery for one of their award winning pies. It didn’t disappoint.

Now that my stomach was satisfied, I was now on my way to Coorow, with only one more stop in Moora to see what the charts were doing, and then to decide really where my chase was going to take me for the day.

I arrived in Coorow believing that I was going to arriving with storms already developing. They were not. It was a nice 29C, a tad humid, and only a few clouds about. My initial feeling was it just didn’t feel like a place where storms were going to develop.
After deciding that Coorow wasn’t really doing anything for me, I decided that a quick trip back to Moora (90kms away) was the only way to go.
On the way back the clouds started to grow and by the time I got to Moora it was fairly evident that storms were definitely on their way.
I sat down again and decided where the best place to go and watch the storms develop, I decided to head west towards Dandaragan.

I got only 10km out of Moora, when I decided to pull over and get my first shots of the day, a quickly developing cell that looked to be around the Watheroo area.

These storms were just developing everywhere, and I was getting ready for a couple of hours of driving and chasing to get in the right position for photos.

When the most northern storm was getting a little close for comfort I jumped in the car and raced about 5km up the road. Just enough time to snap another photo of the cell now really developed and heavy rain starting to fall.

After a very loud rumble of thunder roared overhead, I thought it would be a good time to jump back into the car and head toward Dandaragan.

Again I pulled over just outside the town to take another photo (panorama) of the approaching storm.

After this photo, very heavy rain and small hail hit the area. It was pretty surreal to be parked on the side of the road in the middle of the cell.
I knew I had to get back in front of this cell so I headed through the rain and while driving as carefully as possible eventually got through it. I got to Dandaragan with the wind blowing strong and the cell just minutes behind. I don’t know if Dandaragan got hit at all, because the storm looked like it was just going to pass to the east of the town.

I headed south of Dandaragan towards Regans Ford. I stopped at the CBH depot and had a clear view of the storms to the south. I set my camera up just outside my car and tried a new technique of connecting a 10stop filter to my camera. I have learned that this doesn’t work after knowing that I certainly had CGs in frame and then after reviewing the shot, not one strike on film 🙁

I packed my gear and headed towards Orange Springs Rd off Brand Hwy and bolted to the western end to Cowella Rd, and managed to snap this photo

I then headed south towards Dirigan Rd off Cowella Rd and managed to capture this strike on video. (snapshot)


This is another shot facing west off Cowella Rd

I was now tracking parallel with the storm heading south along Cowella Rd, and observed plenty of CGs and CC strikes.

I got to Gingin Brook Rd and headed towards Military Rd and headed south along there till I got to Wanneroo Rd. By now it was quieting down quite a bit and so I headed into the Pines off Smokebush Rd to get some mammatus cloud shots.
This is taken as the sun was going down and pointed straight up in the sky.

That was the final shot for the day, I drove a total of 604km. Not a bad effort.

Till the next storm…..