Perth’s first Summer Storms

Well they are here, Perth’s summers storms have finally arrived. The very photogenic, high based, branchy lightning that I love capturing started striking north of Perth just before midnight, so I made my way to Jindalee with fellow photographer and weather nut Cameron.
We saw the storms staring to spark a long way to our NW, so we held steady until they got a touch closer, and then made the decision to get off our hill, and down to the sand-dunes. A good move as the storms came right over the top of us, and our spot on the hill probably wasn’t the safest place to be.
I love to capture lightning, but I really like to place subjects in my shot, just to add a different dimension  and perspective to it. So I got Cameron to hold steady and composed a shot I hoped would come out, I just needed the lightning to co-operate.
It did, and I managed these shots of Cameron in his element.
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And this one,

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A majority of the storms were relatively short lived, but they produced some incredible lightning.

Off the coast, my favourite shot of the night.

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It just kept producing amazing bolts. The hardest part, anticipating where the big strike will strike.

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More amazing branchy cloud to ground lightning,

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The boats off the coast, were in the prime location to view the storms. Saying that, I don’t know if I wanted to be under this one.

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As the storms moved over us, we made the decision to move east of the Pinjar pine plantation to try and capture a cell now moving quickly down the Darling Scarp, but the storms were just a bit too fast and were moving to the SE very quickly. Checking the radar, they were hooking through at around 70-80kmh, too quick for us to catch them.

I fired one last shot off before calling it a night.

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Until the next time….

All official forecasts are from Bureau of Meteorology.
Check out PerthWeatherLive on Facebook for updates on the weather around Perth and Western Australia.

Storm Event 6/7-9-13( Gascoyne, Wheatbelt, Lower West)

The most promising setup for thunderstorm development since last summer was forecast for most of the southern half of Western Australia on the 6th of September, and that prompted a certain trip for myself to again get out and try to capture this magical weather phenomenon on my camera.

Just over a week before the storms arrived I noticed on my daily check of forecasted weather that I should start preparing for a road trip up towards the lower Gascoyne region to capture my favourite part, the development.

My day started at around 1030 with a drive to Coorow via Bindoon and the Bindoon Bakery. No storm chase can start without a stop here. So after enjoying a curry lamb pie, I was off up the Great Northern Highway towards Midlands Rd and on to Coorow via Moora.

I arrived in Coorow just after 1330, and had another look at the radar, and satellite imagery to see if anything looked like it was going to develop in the area. I wasn’t in luck, with storms started to fire a long way east on a low pressure trough line cutting through the state. I didn’t worry to much about it, as the afternoon was young, and it gave me a bit of time to scout the area a bit. I am currently working on a time-lapse project and the fields around here work perfectly for one of the scenes I wanted to capture, so off I went to find one suitable for my project.
I found an incredible site and set my camera up and started my time-lapse of the clouds building and collapsing. I had some more time up my sleeve now as my time-lapse was set for 1hr, so I had a bit of a walk around playing on my iPhone.

Coming close to the end of my time-lapse I noticed some development a long way to my north and north-east, so I opened my laptop and again checked the lightning tracker, and it confirmed a major thunderstorm developing very quickly between 150-200km away. I was in two minds, either packed up my camera, stop the time-lapse and move now, or wait for the time-lapse to finish. I decided to wait, as I only had 10minutes or so remaining, but it was the longest 10minutes ever. I was pacing up and down the road, watching these thunderstorm cells popping up and going crazy. They were too far away to see any lightning, but they were large cauliflower clouds with an every increasing anvil spreading across the sky.

My time-lapse finished, I packed my gear up and raced east towards Latham.
I kept my eyes on the development, and I had to pull over near Latham to capture one of the storms.

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As I got to Latham, I had to turn south and now head towards Wubin for fuel, and to meet with fellow storm chaser and friend Steve Brooks (owner of Perth Weather Live, http://www.perthweatherlive.com).

I arrived in Wubin, and met with Steve. He had been watching the cells to the north as well, so with a quick check of the radar to see the direction these cells were going, we saw that they were going to cross well south of Paynes Find to the north, and so the decision was made to get north, and find a spot to set up and capture these systems as they passed us by.

While we were driving the sun started to set and the thunderclouds become illuminated with incredible colours. It was incredible to witness. We were so focused to get to our spot that we missed the opportunity to capture the sunset at its best, but, we still still got a bit of colour and you can see that how it would’ve been incredible 5-10mins before hand.

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When we arrived at our location, we set up and started to capture the storms in the distance. One was to our North-East, one was t our North-West. Both were firing on all cylinders. Flashing, and sparking everywhere. Every second multiple strikes illuminated the clouds. So what did I do. I set up my time-lapse to capture it. I havent finished processing that yet, but when I do, I will post a link to the page it will be hosted on.

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Then the night really began.

A shot of a meteor flying over first cells of the night to the north.

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As the first cells passed over and headed east, the skies to the west now started to light up. Cells were quickly developing to our west, and were going nuts!!

A shot of the Milky Way with the storms firing underneath.

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Large amounts of rain mixed with hail were falling from incredible formations in the clouds.
Something about the structure I just love underneath thunderstorms.

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Lightning was all around

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One of the final cells that passed over before I had to make the long drive home.

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I had to leave, as I had to get back to Perth. The drive home was very eventful. Large hail, strong winds, lightning all around.

An extremely eventful night, but I am so glad I was able to witness it, and not on my own either. Cheers Steve, it was so great to have someone else there, yelling out as much as I was!! 🙂

I just hope this is an indication of a very active spring/summer storm season in the Midwest and Wheatbelt.

More photos to come.

Till next time.

Regan’s Pool, Karijini National Park

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A spot that doesn’t get photographed from this angle often. I managed this as I took part in the West Oz Active gorge tour.
They provide a full days canyoning experience through the magnificent gorges.
If you do bring along camera gear, it’s best to let your guide know, and remember to also bring a dry pack. You will experience times where your gear will travel in the water, and could potentially be submerged.
Luckily I always travel with mine every time I venture up here.

 

Fires seed Pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb)

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In the right conditions fires can produce enough energy to seed Thunderstorm development.
These thunderstorms can continue for a few hours in relatively the same position is the conditions persist.
The particular thunderstorm was linked to a series of thunderstorms along the Kennedy Ranges, North-East of Carnarvon, Western Australia.

Pyrocumulonimbus is the type of cloud you see here reaching upwards from the smoke.

Path to Peppers

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While visiting Tasmania for a friends wedding, my fiancé and I had to make the trip to Cradle Mountain. Many words can be used to describe the scenery in the area, but the only way I can describe it is by calling it God Country. The crisp cool alpine air fills your lungs with each breath, the smells are natural and fresh. The gentle sounds of water running through the creeks.
It is so unique, you just have to visit yourself.
I know i’ll be back.

– Reef Surprises with Dreamy Sunsets –

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Sunsets are sometimes just sensational. This one was no different. I was in Port Hedland, and out shooting with another photographer Sheldon Petit.

The tide was quickly receding and water is left is this reef system. High tide has this reef covered by a meter or so of water. This is the first time I have experienced tidal movements of this scale, but it truly shows how incredible our world around us is. In a couple of hours time, you would never know this reef system even exists.

Pilbara Lines

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Last week I visited my brother in the coastal mining town of Port Hedland.

My camera decided to stop working for a few days after I arrived and I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to capture any images from around the Pilbara town.

Lucky for me, the camera came to life and with a huge sense of relief I managed to get out and about and shoot over the final 2 days I was in the area.

This image was inspired by a landscape photographer who I admire greatly. Can you guess who?

Sunset over Cooke Point, Port Hedland

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This week I am visiting my brother and my best mate in Port Hedland. It is the first time I have visited the port town. My first day here and I was able to capture this sunset over the road of my mates place.

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Another image I capture ( from my iPhone 5 ) from the plane as I was descending into Port Hedland. It shows a dust storm in the distance.

West Cape Howe Karri Abstract

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On my last trip down to the southern region of Western Australia, I visited an area known as West Cape Howe.
On the drive in to the magical national park, you come past a forest of Karri trees. Its just stunning. I drove through the first time without stopping, because I was literally just blown away with the beauty of the area. On the way back out however, it was rest assured that we would stop and take a few photographs.
This abstract from the series of photographs I took in the Karri forest is the vision I created in my mind as we drove through, so I am wrapped to be able to present to you my final product.

I hope you enjoy viewing it, as much as I did creating it.

Lightning over Jandakot and Perth Hills

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On Wednesday (20th, Feb) I headed to Jandakot Airport for a bbq with fellow workmates. The night started as any other, something to eat, a couple of drinks. Then the clouds started rolling in. Lightning began flashing on the western horizon and it wasn’t long till it was over us. I headed to the lookout, and set up my camera. The lightning tracked just to the south and east of the airport, providing a great opportunity to capture a few shots.

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Lightning, I just cannot get enough of its beauty. No single strike is ever the same, and it truly is a genuine shot. No-one else will ever capture the same strike again.
Hope to capture more as I head north to Port Hedland next week.

I also run another photoblog website at
Severeweatherphotography.com.au

I update when ever head out and follow thunderstorms and manage to capture natures most incredible phenomena.

If you enjoy my page, it would be great if you can share my website address around.

Lightning over Jandakot and the Perth Hills

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On Wednesday (20th, Feb) I headed to Jandakot Airport for a bbq with fellow workmates. The night started as any other, something to eat, a couple of drinks. Then the clouds started rolling in. Lightning began flashing on the western horizon and it wasn’t long till it was over us. I headed to the lookout, and set up my camera. The lightning tracked just to the south and east of the airport, providing a great opportunity to capture a few shots.

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Lightning, just cannot get enough of its beauty. No single strike is ever the same, and it truly is a genuine shot. No-one else will ever capture the same strike again.
Hope to capture more as I head north to Port Hedland next week.

First Light over Bali

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This is a re-edit of a previous panorama. I loved this view so much I had to re-create a vision I had of this image when I viewed it again. I hope you like it.

“After starting out at 2am to climb Mt Batur on the Indonesian island of Bali, we eventually made it just in time for sunrise. We walked around the creator edge to hopefully get a better view away from the crown now gathering at the first summit (That point can be seen in the middle of the image, identified by the flags).
It was a great climb with my gorgeous fiancé Irene, and this is the sunrise we were treated to. Absolutely worth it. It is rated as one of the best volcano climbs in the world due to the classical volcano shape Mt Batur has.
Oh and if  you are wondering what the steam is coming out of the creator. Mt Batur is still an active volcano with the last eruption only in 2000”

– Milky Way on Show –

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A few weeks ago I headed out to this lighthouse with fellow photographer Shawn Haywood, his wife Melanie and daughter Zoe.
No moon meant great conditons for shooting the Milky Way, but unfortunately I didnt come to prepared and I shot with a slow lens at f4.0.
Next time I wont make the mistake of leaving my faster at home.
Having not scouted the area previous to this visit, I was a little unsure about wandering to far from the path as cliff straight down the ocean were all around.
So I decided a time-lapse of Shawn and his family enjoying a night out under the stars.
This photo was one I took just before I started the time-lapse.

Perfect Pilbara

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The Pilbara region is located in Western Australia and is home to Australia’s iron ore reserves. Other then mining, the region is consistently referred to as ‘gods country’, the reason being is its incredible landscape. It is very easy to just get lost in your own thoughts looking over the landscape from a high vantage point.
I am just biting at the bit to get back up there again.